Welcome to NBR Wrinklies

Seeking Info

                   
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  Below are the stories where information was being sought it is a motley but interesting collection
Please click on the story to go to the part of this page which shows the facts

 

Oakington Plane

French names on War Memorial
A Young man from Spain looking for help

Was it a golf Ball

The first request for help for the Oakington plane


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October 31 2009

Below is a fascinating story in which NB was involved a century ago--Nick Harrison inherited a box of old papers and in the year 2000 decide to investigate more as to what happened to the effort by Grose and Feary to build the first British plane  I have copied only part of the story--please go to the web site below to read more

http://www.oakingtonplane.co.uk/

 

Subsequently there was a progarmme on the BBC which you can see by clicking copy and paste to your browser ;


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/puffbox/hyperpuff/audiovideo/england/norfolk/8332252.stm

The Editor thanks Nick Harrison for all his information and the great story

     THE OAKINGTON MONOPLANE 

                     The Grose-Feary (Oakington) Monoplane
 

Home

The Oakington monoplane was built in 1909 by two Oakington residents Grose & Feary, in an attempt to win the prize of £1,000 offered by the Daily Mail, for the first all British plane to fly a circular mile, piloted by a Briton.
This website was set up as part of the research project into the monoplane and engine, to find 
out why it didn't fly and what  happened to the men who built it after they left Oakington. 


The 2009 Grose-Feary Replica as displayed at Marshall's Centenary on 20th Sept 2009.


Here you will find pages about the monoplane, Grose & Feary, the suppliers, where it was built in Oakington and the Daily Mail competition. It is hoped to find relatives of Grose & Feary so there is now a family tree section for both families.
As very little was known about The Advance Motor Manufacturing Co. of Northampton, a separate section has been created on all their activities including engines, motorcycles, tricars & forecars.
As the research has progressed, information on other local avaition projects has emerged, so another section has been set up to cater for them.
Please enjoy the site and if you have anything to add, please do get in touch via the contact page.

Please click on these headings below to learn more

The Plane    Replica Build  Prop Fund  Support  Cambs Chronicle  Grose  Feary  Advance V4   Handley Page  Walter Windham
North Brit' Rubber  H V Quinsee  Manor Farm  Daily Mail  Grose Family Tree  Feary Family Tree  Wanted

 
Contact
Acknowledgements
Links
Sitemap
 
Sponsored by:
Round Peg
Web design:
MJB Data


August 2009
We no longer have a  conundrum-- the war memorial which originally was at Castle Mills is now on 
display at the National Musuem in Chambers Street Edinburgh  there were two Frenchmen shown.

A Billard of Le 21 Oe Regiment d'Infantrie

L. Knurr of Le 269 Regiment d'Infantrie
                                      
They definitely worked in the Paris office of North British Rubber Company


                                      

February 9 2008

A young gentleman Pablo from Spain is asking for help 
with his research and I quote;

I'm a Master Thesis researcher in Graphic Design by the Central University
of Barcelona about "Advertising in Pioneer Tire Companies. The early years".
This full illustrated Thesis have capitals about the use of character
trademarks (like Mr. Dunlop, Bibendum Michelin,  John Bull or Stepney bulldog
tires) and I have few 1920s examples that show the North British Rubber Co.
Using a Lion as a mascot and trademark logo.

Below are the three copies sent to me by Pablo 
and we thank him for taking the time and trouble to help us



Top Line reads
Made in four patterns of unequal quality

To continue Pablo says ;
I only want to confirm if you know the Lion was ever used or appeared only
in few campaigns, and also if you have scan images of papers, ads or other
signs with the use of the lion

If anyone can help can they please contact the Editor editornbrinklies@aol.com who will pass the information onto Pablo in Barcelona Spain

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January 9 2008
This is an interesting story of a lady in Canada trying to solve some recent history for her family and friends--it involves a gentleman from Canada visiting Scotland in 1951 and being presented with a ball which the recipient, a QC, believed was an old golf ball--below you will find the correspondence and some of the findings--However as at today the proof is not yet final---but its a good and interesting read

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Hello -
While  searching for information on the North British Rubber Company, I happened upon your website and wonder if you might have any insight into the authenticity of this article.A friend of mine has the ball pictured, which was owned originally by her great uncle. The clipping is from a  newsletter of the golf club to which he belonged in Canada, written on the occasion  of his being made a Life Member.
I don't know whether your archives would have anything about Mr. Gordon and whether he might have presented someone with such a rare gift, but it seems worth an inquiry.  I'm sure Mr. Rutledge believed the ball was as described, but whether he had been given accurate information, we don't know.
If you can be of any help, I will greatly appreciate hearing from you.
Thanks,
Mary Danforth
|

 

This is in the records of the Ashburn Golf club in Canada


and below is the comments from the Mr Routledge

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The Editor replied to Mary as follows

Just a note to say that we are still working on your query--The old Board minutes of 1950 have been located but are now being examined--we are 90% sure the Mr Gordon was the Managing Director of North British Rubber Company at that time but are not 100% sure--Hoping to prove it soon but probably after the holidays
May I wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year
Sincerely
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The Editor then asked for help and sent a note as follows

 Editor to Dick Bell, Jim Finlay Martin Hale and Sandy Kay  

 I received this from Mary, the lady in Canada as a follow up to my original reply 
where I indicated that I thought Mr Gordon was MD at NBR in 1950 but not totally confirmed and I would come back to her
. I am hoping that the old Board minutes of the late forties early fifties will solve the problem
Editor
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Mary Replied ---Thank you so much for all you are doing on this - I hope I haven't asked too much of your organization. After sending pictures of the ball to a number of collectors and auctioneers with an interest in golf memorabilia, I've been told by every one of them that this is not a golf ball, but a "fives" ball -- of little or no value. So, either Mr. Rutledge was misinformed at the time he was given the ball or he was given incorrect information about it after he got home. I am told that he was a very proper, honest gentleman, so it's unlikely that he made up the story as a joke and then let it be printed in his golf club newsletter. Nor would he have sent the clipping to his great niece for her family "archives". I would still be interested in the part of the story that pertains to Mr. Gordon, so if it's not too much trouble, I'll look forward to hearing the results of your research. 
Mary
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Mary then came back with a note as follows

Dear David,
Thank you so much for all you are doing on this - I hope I haven't asked too much of your organization. After sending pictures of the ball to a number of collectors and auctioneers with an interest in golf memorabilia, I've been told by every one of them that this is not a golf ball, but a "fives" ball -- of little or no value. So, either Mr. Rutledge was misinformed at the time he was given the ball or he was given incorrect information about it after he got home. I am told that he was a very proper, honest gentleman, so it's unlikely that he made up the story as a joke and then let it be printed in his golf club newsletter. Nor would he have sent the clipping to his great niece for her family "archives". I would still be interested in the part of the story that pertains to Mr. Gordon, so if it's not too much trouble, I'll look forward to hearing the results of your research.
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Then the editor received an e-mail today from Dick Bell as follows

Gents,
I asked our librarian to investigate the Odd Ball and Fives and here is what she came up with. Sounds creadible and appears its not an early golf ball, but maybe made by NBR for Edinburgh University Fives Club.
Richard


Kathleen Rainwater the Gates company's librarian was asked by Richard Bell to dig to see what she could find and this was her reply:

Richard
I found a few pictures of  featherie golf balls – and all of them appear to have a different construction than the ball given to Mr. Rutledge.

 
http://www.greatvaluegolf.co.uk/golf_equipment_golf_balls_guide_one.aspx

 

 

http://www.portalgolf.eu/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=10&Itemid=18

 A further interesting bit of information supplied by Kathleen was :

  This featherie is currently for sale on Ebay: to see please click

 http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/VERY-RARE-Genuine-Victorian-Feather-Golf-Ball-C1840s_
W0QQitemZ110211431196QQihZ001QQcategoryZ38327QQcmdZViewItem

The ‘featherie’ referred to being on sale on eBay  is available for $4950…
 

Kathleen continued 

I could only find one image of a fives ball  - it has a similar construction to the ball you are inquiring about.

http://etonfives.co.uk/images/ball.jpg

The Edinburgh University Fives Club describes the game as:

“Like squash, fives is played in a four-sided court with the general idea
 being to hit the ball above the bar across the front wall so that the opposition cannot return it before the second bounce. A fives ball is slightly larger than 
a golf ball, leather covered and hard. 
Unlike a squash ball, it loses little pace off the walls and floor and bounces 
high and fast.  The court is slightly smaller than a squash court and has a stone, rather than wooden, floor.
“  http://hometown.aol.co.uk/edinburghfives/what_is.html

The Wessex Fives club describes the game of fives as : “A version of handball
 is a sport in which players compete by hitting a ball with their hands against a wall. It is played in  every country in the world. The British version is called Fives and is run by the Fives  Federation which oversees the running of one, three and four wall Fives in this country. 
There are over 100 Fives playing centres in schools and sports centres across Britain . http://www.freewebs.com/wessexfives/
 

 

Please wait for the next instalment--Editor


    
 

July 12 2007

We have been contacted  by Nick Harrison who found our NBR website and wondered " whether any of your members would be able to help me with my research. In 1909 Messrs Grose & Feary built a monoplane in our village using NBR rubberised cloth."

Nick has a web site http://www.oakingtonplane.co.uk please go there to see the project --it is very well presented and if anyone can help with information please contact the editornbrinklies@aol.com


Below is the NBR advertisement for the fabric